• NRA
    NRA We Serve America's Restaurants Representing nearly 500,000 restaurant businesses, we advocate for restaurant and foodservice industry interests and provide tools and systems that help members of all sizes achieve success.
  • NRAEF
    NRAEF Building & Retaining Talent The NRAEF is focused on developing a stronger workforce and building the next generation of industry leaders through education, scholarships and community engagement.
  • NRA Show
    NRA Show May 17-20, 2014 As the international foodservice marketplace, the NRA Show provides unparalleled opportunities for buyers and sellers to come together, conduct business and learn from each other.
  • ServSafe
    ServSafe Minimize Risk. Maximize Protection. For over 40 years, ServSafe® training programs have delivered the knowledge, leadership and protection that have earned the trust and confidence of business leaders everywhere.
  • Edge
    Edge Edge℠ Prepaid Discover® Card Simplify payroll processes, realize cost savings and improve productivity while providing a valuable financial tool that is uniquely tailored to fit your employees’ lifestyle.

National Restaurant Association - Soft openings: Practice makes perfect

Skip to navigation Skip to content

Manage My Restaurant

Share:
Email Print

Soft openings: Practice makes perfect

What’s the difference between a film premiere and a restaurant opening? “At a film opening, you’re showcasing a finished product, while at a restaurant opening, you’re just getting started,” says New York City-based restaurant consultant Clark Wolf. “And nobody gets everything perfect the first time.” That’s why Wolf often advises having a “soft opening” to work out the kinks.

A soft opening can differ from one restaurant to another. For some businesses, it means quietly opening their doors without any advertisements or fanfare; for others, it’s hosting a “Friends and Family Night” or a charity event that provides valuable practice before opening to the general public. “The type of opening really depends on the time of the year, where you are located and who you are,” says Wolf. If a soft opening doesn’t work into your plans, find another way for your staff to practice, says Wolf, like having half your employees serve the rest.

Here is a look at how two different restaurants served up their soft openings.

A slow rollout

Central Food in Spokane, Wash., opened “without a website, without advertising, without a sign on the door,” says chef/owner David Blaine, a familiar face in the local culinary scene. With the community already abuzz about Blaine launching a new restaurant, the chef kept opening day quiet.  “If there’s a big splash and people are lined up at the door, you’re not going to be able to take the time to speak with customers,” he notes.

To ease staff into the routine, Central Food operated limited hours opening week, offering only breakfast and lunch the first four days, and serving dinner only on the fifth day. “I like going a little slow at the beginning,” says Blaine. “The staff isn’t as efficient at first.” Items were offered at regular menu prices. “Having my staff cook up a lot of free food doesn’t appeal to me.”

The restaurant offered a limited menu at first to simplify operations. For example, three sandwiches appeared on what was labeled the “Beta” menu, and now there are six. Blaine rolled out menu items over a six-week period and trained servers to encourage customers to return later to see the full offerings.

Freebies for Friends and Family

San Diego’s Blind Burro took a different tact for its soft opening, offering three nights of complimentary food to friends and family. At an intimate “sneak peak” happy hour, servers brought out select menu items and drinks. “We invited people to join us in training our staff,” says managing partner Frank Miller, who made it clear to invitees that this was not the time for comments about service or decor--which were still being touched up--but for staff to practice their menu knowledge and food and drink production.        

A week later, the restaurant was prepped for the next step--full service for 100 invitees on each of two Friends and Family Nights. “We offered the full menu,” says Miller. “We wanted to do it 100 percent. There’s no sense in offering five out of 20 items, because we won’t do that when we’re open.” Miller estimates that the three nights cost a total of at least $20,000. “Everyone is banking on the place being a success, so the short-term cost is worth the long-term investment.”

The soft opening helped him iron out countless details. “The host stand and POS terminal were on the wrong side, there were too many people on the line at the wrong times, not enough people behind the right bar,” says Miller, whose team stationed notepads throughout the restaurant for staff to jot down any issues.

“Several years ago, when I opened a nightclub/bar in Louisiana, I was the guy who didn’t want to spend money on a Friends and Family Night.” The result: an inefficient opening night with less than stellar food and performance. “Having a soft opening is definitely worth it,” says Miller. “You just can’t wing it when it counts.”

 

▲ Back to Top

Fintech

Fintech

Health Care HQ

HC HQ Ad

We're glad you're here!®

® 2012-2013 National Restaurant Association. All rights reserved.

2055 L St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 331-5900 | (800) 424-5156