• NRA
    NRA We Serve America's Restaurants Representing nearly 500,000 restaurant businesses, we advocate for restaurant and foodservice industry interests and provide tools and systems that help members of all sizes achieve success.
  • NRAEF
    NRAEF Building & Retaining Talent The NRAEF is focused on developing a stronger workforce and building the next generation of industry leaders through education, scholarships and community engagement.
  • NRA Show
    NRA Show May 20-23, 2017 As the international foodservice marketplace, the NRA Show provides unparalleled opportunities for buyers and sellers to come together, conduct business and learn from each other.
  • ServSafe
    ServSafe Minimize Risk. Maximize Protection. For over 40 years, ServSafe® training programs have delivered the knowledge, leadership and protection that have earned the trust and confidence of business leaders everywhere.

National Restaurant Association - Lawmakers seek joint-employer delay

Skip to navigation Skip to content

News & Research

Share:
Email Print
News RSS

Lawmakers seek joint-employer delay

Today we applauded Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-New Jersey, and Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, for their bipartisan work in trying to roll back the National Labor Relation Board’s definition of the joint-employer standard.

The two, if successful, could bring much needed relief to restaurants and other small businesses around the country.

Fifty-seven legislators sent a letter April 5 to Rep. Tom Cole, R-Oklahoma, chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on Labor, and ranking member Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., asking them to include language in the Labor-HHS 2018 budget that would put a one-year hold on this “harmful and confusing new definition of joint employers.”

The new definition would hold businesses liable for the “management and actions of workers they do business with, but don’t actually employ or control,” the lawmakers wrote.

“The new standard could extend liability from individual franchisees to brand companies, from subcontractors to larger employers and even from a vendor or supplier to the company purchasing their products or services.”

In August 2015, the controversial NLRB decision to change the definition determined that two companies should be considered Joint Employers through indirect and potential control of employees. The 3-2 decision reversed nearly 30 years of labor law, which held that an employer needed to have actual or direct control over employees.

MacArthur and Cuellar have urged Cole and DeLauro to use the Appropriations process to put the definition on hold.

Conserve RSS Healthcare RSS Conserve RSS

▲ Back to Top

New report

Spot Ad right

We're glad you're here!®

® 2012-2017 National Restaurant Association. All rights reserved.

2055 L St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 331-5900 | (800) 424-5156